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Schott Music

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Welcome to WERGO – New Music for more than 50 Years

Helmut Lachenmann: Got Lost
In “Got Lost” Lachenmann used four lines from Nietzsche, the poem “All Love Letters Are Ridiculous” by Fernando Pessoa and a short note in English lamenting the loss of a laundry basket which gave this work its name.
Helmut Lachenmann: Got Lost


Karlheinz Stockhausen: STRAHLEN
The documentary film provides an interesting insight into the incredible complexity of the production process of “STRAHLEN”. Special techniques had to be used to record Stockhausen’s ten-channel composition with its spatial information on a DVD. In addition, the DVD contains an exclusive interview, which Ludger Brümmer, head of the IMA, held with Karlheinz Stockhausen.
Karlheinz Stockhausen: STRAHLEN


Chaya Czernowin: HIDDEN
‘HIDDEN’ is a slowly unfolding, 45-minute listening experience that permits our ears to turn into eyes. Our ears are given space and time to become accustomed to a totally unpredictable territory of sound.” (Chaya Czernowin)
Chaya Czernowin: HIDDEN


Enjott Schneider: Mystic Landscapes
“Mystic Landscapes” is the eighth of 10 CDs in WERGO’s continuing “Edition Enjott Schneider”.
The Rhine and the Black Forest are mystical and legendary landscapes that throughout the world are seen as inspirations for German Romanticism. Enjott Schneider conceived this recording as a tribute to these landscapes, not as illustrative program music, but as an attempt to capture a certain mood in sound.
Enjott Schneider: Mystic Landscapes


Mauricio Kagel: Mimetics
In 1961, Mauricio Kagel wrote a piano piece with two titles. As a solo work, it is called “Metapiece. It can also, however, be played together – either simultaneously or in alternation – with other pieces by Kagel or other living composers, and is then called Mimetics. The pianist Sabine Liebner has accepted Kagel’s invitation to collaborate and undertaken her own musical journey through the composer’s piano music.
Mauricio Kagel: Mimetics


John Cage | Toshio Hosokawa: Frozen Time
ohn Cage approached the music from Japan from its roots in Zen Buddhism and its intent to imitate nature. One important element in this context is the interpretational freedom of the performers, who can adjust the musical text to their own inner state or rhythm. Toshio Hosokawa employs Japanese aesthetic principles using both Western and traditional Japanese instruments and ensembles, in the process bringing the sounds of the two traditions into closer proximity.
John Cage | Toshio Hosokawa: Frozen Time


Wilhelm Killmayer: Summer’s End
Wilhelm Killmayer has written songs since the beginning of his career as a composer, and they are a prominent and essential part of his oeuvre. In the case of Killmayer’s songs, one can clearly see various musical effects influenced by the texts being set, yet these effects nevertheless retain a basic musical identity.
Wilhelm Killmayer: Summer’s End


Hans Zender: Dialogue with Haydn | Issei no kyō | Nanzen no kyō
All the characteristics of Zender’s composing outlined above are combined on this CD: the recreation of a concrete music history model in “Dialogue with Haydn”, the immersion in the Asian mode of thought in the two “…no kyō” compositions, the use of microtonality in “Dialogue” and “Issei no kyō“. All three pieces share a humorous-ironic undertone.
Hans Zender: Dialogue with Haydn | Issei no kyō | Nanzen no kyō


John Cage: Chess Pieces | Four Dances – Tom Johnson: Rational Melodies
Trio Omphalos has been performing original and exciting programs with new music since it was founded in 2006 – in the rare lineup of clarinet, drums and piano.
The trio discovered John Cage’s “Chess Pieces” in 2012, a graphic image composition by Cage that the pianist Margret Lang Tan translated into a piano version. Trio Omphalos has created an expressive and colourful trio version out of this.
John Cage | Tom Johnson: Chess Pieces | Four Dances