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The Fate of His Ashes

The Fate of His Ashes

A Requiem for Victims of Power

for SATB chorus and organ

text from the Epistle to the Reader of "Hydriotaphia" (1658) by Sir Thomas Browne


  • Instrumentation: mixed choir (SATB) and organ
  • Edition: choral score
  • Language: English
  • Order No.: ED 31297
€18.95
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description
The text for this piece is derived from the Epistle to the Reader of Sir Thomas Browne’s Hydriotaphia, (1658). Subtitled Urn Burial, the essay is a reflection on the discovery of a Roman urn burial site in Norfolk and the practice of disinterment. I compiled the text by redacting (i.e. eliminating) many of the words of the original, leaving behind a ghostly contemplation on the metaphysical uses of a body after death. Something hidden is revealed by elimination. Death eliminates too, and can reveal. The circumstances of a death can transform a life lived privately, outside the public eye, into something very public. After its final breath, a body can expose much about power, race and America. The act of extinguishing a life can extend and amplify that life; one’s potential and influence can blossom at death and outlive a body’s time spent on earth. The person has vanished and what remains are literally their remains, now a parable of larger forces in the world. Douglas J. Cuomo — New York City, 2016
Details
Auftragswerk : Commissioned by Seraphic Fire, Patrick Dupré Quigley, Artistic Director, in partnership with John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
ISMN: 979-0-60001-250-3
Performance duration: 10'0"
Publisher: Schott Music Corporation
Subtitle: A Requiem for Victims of Power
Uraufführung : 11. November 2016 Coral Gables, FL, First United Methodist Church (USA) · Nathan Laube, organ · Dirigent: Patrick Dupré Quigley · Seraphic Fire
Year of composition: 2016
page number: 20
The text for this piece is derived from the Epistle to the Reader of Sir Thomas Browne’s Hydriotaphia, (1658). Subtitled Urn Burial, the essay is a reflection on the discovery of a Roman urn burial site in Norfolk and the practice of disinterment. I compiled the text by redacting (i.e. eliminating) many of the words of the original, leaving behind a ghostly contemplation on the metaphysical uses of a body after death. Something hidden is revealed by elimination. Death eliminates too, and can reveal. The circumstances of a death can transform a life lived privately, outside the public eye, into something very public. After its final breath, a body can expose much about power, race and America. The act of extinguishing a life can extend and amplify that life; one’s potential and influence can blossom at death and outlive a body’s time spent on earth. The person has vanished and what remains are literally their remains, now a parable of larger forces in the world. Douglas J. Cuomo — New York City, 2016
Auftragswerk : Commissioned by Seraphic Fire, Patrick Dupré Quigley, Artistic Director, in partnership with John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
ISMN: 979-0-60001-250-3
Performance duration: 10'0"
Publisher: Schott Music Corporation
Subtitle: A Requiem for Victims of Power
Uraufführung : 11. November 2016 Coral Gables, FL, First United Methodist Church (USA) · Nathan Laube, organ · Dirigent: Patrick Dupré Quigley · Seraphic Fire
Year of composition: 2016
page number: 20
Conductor: Patrick Dupré Quigley
2016-11-13 | Washington, DC (United States of America), St. John\'s Georgetown Concert Series
Conductor: Patrick Dupré Quigley
2016-11-12 | Ft. Lauderdale, FL (United States of America), All Saints Episcopal
Conductor: Patrick Dupré Quigley
2016-11-11 | Coral Gables, FL (United States of America), First United Methodist Church