Schott Music

Skip to Main Content »

Language
 
Shopping Cart (0 item)
My Cart

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Classics meet Jazz

Classics meet Jazz

20 famous classical pieces, original version + jazzy arrangement

von Uwe Korn


  • Instrumentation: piano
  • Order No.: ED 20177D Q52329
€12.99  *
Incl. 7% Tax

Download Edition

- +
Description
This volume contains a wide selection of famous musical themes from Bach to Carl Orff.  Some of them were originally written for the piano; most have had their scores carefully arranged to make them easy to play on the piano. Each piece is followed with a jazz interpretation, which can either be played alone or alongside the 'original' version.
Perhaps this will show that the 'classics' are not all that far removed from jazz, and that music of earlier periods contains many of the essential characteristics of jazz. Doesn't Lully's 'Gavotte', for instance, contain one of the most famous jazz themes ever?  The 'Blue Gavotte' may make this clearer. The theme from Mozart's Sonata in A major (K 331) doesn't require many rhythmic changes to give it a blues flavour ('Mozart Goes Blues'). The driving rhythm of the ostinato bass in Carl Orff's 'O Fortuna' would suit modern jazz-rock performers well, with a few small changes ('A Fortune for a Tune'). What do Bizet's 'Habanera', Brahms' 'Hungarian Dance No. 5' and Paganini's 'Caprice No. 24' have in common?  Why have they been turned into salsa music ('Habanera con Cigarro', 'Hungarian Salsa No. 5', 'Capriccio Latino')? Much of this is up to the individual: if you want to discover similarities, they are easy to find.
It is difficult to convey a jazz interpretation through musical notation alone, so audio files for download are included - not to demonstrate the only possible interpretation, but to offer ideas and suggestions.
Details
Content text: Rossini: Der Barbier von Sevilla (Thema aus der Ouvertüre)
Korn: The Barber’s Swing
J. S. Bach: Badinerie aus der Suite Nr.2
Korn: Goodinery
J. S. Bach: Toccata d-Moll BWV 565
Korn: Jazz Toccata
Lully: Gavotte
Korn: Blue Gavotte
Haydn: Sinfonie Nr. 94 Paukenschlag (Thema aus dem 2. Satz)
Korn: Surprise Samba
Paganini / Liszt: Caprice Nr.24
Korn: Jazz Caprice
Händel: Sarabande aus der Suite in d-Moll HWV 437
Korn: Sarabanda Rock
Ivanovici: Donauwellen
Korn: Blue Danube Waves
Bizet: Habanera aus “Carmen”
Korn: Habanera con Cigarro
W. A. Mozart: Sonate A-Dur KV 331 Thema aus dem 1. Satz
Korn: Mozart Goes Blues
Smetana: Die Moldau
Korn: Moldau at Night
Verdi: Triumph-Marsch aus Aida
Korn: Aida Groove
Beethoven: Die Wut über den verlorenen Groschen
Korn: Lost Penny Rag
R. Schumann: Träumerei
Korn: Dreamery
Monti: Czardas
Korn: Jazz Czardas
Grieg: Lied der Solvejg
Korn: Solvejg’s Bossa
Grieg: In der Halle des Bergkönigs aus Peer Gynt
Korn: The Mountain Kings Mood
Monteverdi: Lamento d’Arianna
Korn: Ariana’s Dream
Brahms: Ungarischer Tanz Nr.5
Korn: Hungarian Salsa No.5
Orff: O Fortuna aus “Carmina Burana”
Korn: A Fortune For A Tune
Difficulty: easy - intermediate
Publisher: Schott Music
page number: 88
This volume contains a wide selection of famous musical themes from Bach to Carl Orff.  Some of them were originally written for the piano; most have had their scores carefully arranged to make them easy to play on the piano. Each piece is followed with a jazz interpretation, which can either be played alone or alongside the 'original' version.
Perhaps this will show that the 'classics' are not all that far removed from jazz, and that music of earlier periods contains many of the essential characteristics of jazz. Doesn't Lully's 'Gavotte', for instance, contain one of the most famous jazz themes ever?  The 'Blue Gavotte' may make this clearer. The theme from Mozart's Sonata in A major (K 331) doesn't require many rhythmic changes to give it a blues flavour ('Mozart Goes Blues'). The driving rhythm of the ostinato bass in Carl Orff's 'O Fortuna' would suit modern jazz-rock performers well, with a few small changes ('A Fortune for a Tune'). What do Bizet's 'Habanera', Brahms' 'Hungarian Dance No. 5' and Paganini's 'Caprice No. 24' have in common?  Why have they been turned into salsa music ('Habanera con Cigarro', 'Hungarian Salsa No. 5', 'Capriccio Latino')? Much of this is up to the individual: if you want to discover similarities, they are easy to find.
It is difficult to convey a jazz interpretation through musical notation alone, so audio files for download are included - not to demonstrate the only possible interpretation, but to offer ideas and suggestions.
Content text: Rossini: Der Barbier von Sevilla (Thema aus der Ouvertüre)
Korn: The Barber’s Swing
J. S. Bach: Badinerie aus der Suite Nr.2
Korn: Goodinery
J. S. Bach: Toccata d-Moll BWV 565
Korn: Jazz Toccata
Lully: Gavotte
Korn: Blue Gavotte
Haydn: Sinfonie Nr. 94 Paukenschlag (Thema aus dem 2. Satz)
Korn: Surprise Samba
Paganini / Liszt: Caprice Nr.24
Korn: Jazz Caprice
Händel: Sarabande aus der Suite in d-Moll HWV 437
Korn: Sarabanda Rock
Ivanovici: Donauwellen
Korn: Blue Danube Waves
Bizet: Habanera aus “Carmen”
Korn: Habanera con Cigarro
W. A. Mozart: Sonate A-Dur KV 331 Thema aus dem 1. Satz
Korn: Mozart Goes Blues
Smetana: Die Moldau
Korn: Moldau at Night
Verdi: Triumph-Marsch aus Aida
Korn: Aida Groove
Beethoven: Die Wut über den verlorenen Groschen
Korn: Lost Penny Rag
R. Schumann: Träumerei
Korn: Dreamery
Monti: Czardas
Korn: Jazz Czardas
Grieg: Lied der Solvejg
Korn: Solvejg’s Bossa
Grieg: In der Halle des Bergkönigs aus Peer Gynt
Korn: The Mountain Kings Mood
Monteverdi: Lamento d’Arianna
Korn: Ariana’s Dream
Brahms: Ungarischer Tanz Nr.5
Korn: Hungarian Salsa No.5
Orff: O Fortuna aus “Carmina Burana”
Korn: A Fortune For A Tune
Difficulty: easy - intermediate
Publisher: Schott Music
page number: 88