Schott Music

Skip to Main Content »

Language
 
Shopping Cart (0 item)
My Cart

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Der zerbrochene Krug

Der zerbrochene Krug

Opera in one act

Text by Viktor Ullmann based on Heinrich von Kleist

Version for reduced orchestra by Richard Whilds (2017)


  • Edition: performance material
  • Language: German

 
Description
Viktor Ullmann composed his setting of Heinrich von Kleist’s popular dramatic comedy in 1942 between his two operas Der Sturz des Antichrist [The Fall of Antichrist] (1936) and Der Kaiser von Atlantis [The Emperor of Atlantis] (1943) against the background of an increasingly bleak political situation.

The score was completed only a few weeks prior to Ullmann’s deportation to the concentration camp Theresienstadt. Nonetheless, these tragic omens appear only to have had an underlying effect on the humorous and trenchant work. On a superficial level, Ullmann largely adheres to Kleist’s text (albeit with highly effective abridgements) and concisely relates the story of the village judge Adam who has to pass judgement on his own misdeed – the broken pitcher of Marthe – and is ultimately unmasked as the true culprit.

Closer study of the text reveals several passages which can clearly be interpreted as a commentary on the iniquities of the justice system under the Third Reich. Specifically, the final verse, written by Ullmann himself, is set in the context of the Nazi’s Volksgerichtshof (People’s Court) and its henchmen in the red robes of judges, a witty but undisguised warning: ‘Fiat justitia, | damals wie ebenda: | Richter soll keiner sein, | ist nicht sein Herze rein.’ (Fiat justitia: then as now, no-one should be a judge if his heart is not pure).
Details
Opus: op. 36
Performance duration: 50'0"
Publisher: Schott Music
Year of composition: 1942
instrumentation: 1 · 1 · 1 · Tenorsax. · 1 - 2 · 1 · 1 · 0 - P. S. (Glsp. · Trgl. · Beckenpaar · hg. Beck. · Schellen · Tamb. · kl. Tr. · gr. Tr. m. Beck. · Kast. · Ratsche) (3 Spieler) - Cemb. - Str.
occupation: Walter, Gerichtsrat · Bass - Adam, Dorfrichter · hoher Bass-Buffo - Licht, Schreiber · Tenor-Buffo - Frau Marthe Rull · tiefer Alt - Eve, ihre Tochter · lyrischer Sopran - Veit Tümpel, ein Bauer · Bariton - Ruprecht, sein Sohn · Heldentenor - Frau Brigitte · Alt - Erste Magd · Sopran - Zweite Magd · Alt - Ein Büttel · stumme Rolle
Delivery rights: worldwide
Performances
Conductor: Karsten Januschke
Orchestra: Münchener Kammerorchester
2018-04-29 | München (Germany), Cuvilliés Theater — 19:00
Conductor: Karsten Januschke
Orchestra: Münchener Kammerorchester
2018-04-27 | München (Germany), Cuvilliés Theater — 19:00
Conductor: Karsten Januschke
Orchestra: Münchener Kammerorchester
2018-04-25 | München (Germany), Cuvilliés Theater — 19:00
Conductor: Karsten Januschke
Orchestra: Münchener Kammerorchester
2018-04-15 | München (Germany), Cuvilliés Theater — 19:00
Conductor: Karsten Januschke
Orchestra: Münchener Kammerorchester
2018-04-13 | München (Germany), Cuvilliés Theater — 19:00 | World Premiere
Audio Stream
Viktor Ullmann composed his setting of Heinrich von Kleist’s popular dramatic comedy in 1942 between his two operas Der Sturz des Antichrist [The Fall of Antichrist] (1936) and Der Kaiser von Atlantis [The Emperor of Atlantis] (1943) against the background of an increasingly bleak political situation.

The score was completed only a few weeks prior to Ullmann’s deportation to the concentration camp Theresienstadt. Nonetheless, these tragic omens appear only to have had an underlying effect on the humorous and trenchant work. On a superficial level, Ullmann largely adheres to Kleist’s text (albeit with highly effective abridgements) and concisely relates the story of the village judge Adam who has to pass judgement on his own misdeed – the broken pitcher of Marthe – and is ultimately unmasked as the true culprit.

Closer study of the text reveals several passages which can clearly be interpreted as a commentary on the iniquities of the justice system under the Third Reich. Specifically, the final verse, written by Ullmann himself, is set in the context of the Nazi’s Volksgerichtshof (People’s Court) and its henchmen in the red robes of judges, a witty but undisguised warning: ‘Fiat justitia, | damals wie ebenda: | Richter soll keiner sein, | ist nicht sein Herze rein.’ (Fiat justitia: then as now, no-one should be a judge if his heart is not pure).
Opus: op. 36
Performance duration: 50'0"
Publisher: Schott Music
Year of composition: 1942
instrumentation: 1 · 1 · 1 · Tenorsax. · 1 - 2 · 1 · 1 · 0 - P. S. (Glsp. · Trgl. · Beckenpaar · hg. Beck. · Schellen · Tamb. · kl. Tr. · gr. Tr. m. Beck. · Kast. · Ratsche) (3 Spieler) - Cemb. - Str.
occupation: Walter, Gerichtsrat · Bass - Adam, Dorfrichter · hoher Bass-Buffo - Licht, Schreiber · Tenor-Buffo - Frau Marthe Rull · tiefer Alt - Eve, ihre Tochter · lyrischer Sopran - Veit Tümpel, ein Bauer · Bariton - Ruprecht, sein Sohn · Heldentenor - Frau Brigitte · Alt - Erste Magd · Sopran - Zweite Magd · Alt - Ein Büttel · stumme Rolle
Delivery rights: worldwide
Conductor: Karsten Januschke
Orchestra: Münchener Kammerorchester
2018-04-29 | München (Germany), Cuvilliés Theater — 19:00
Conductor: Karsten Januschke
Orchestra: Münchener Kammerorchester
2018-04-27 | München (Germany), Cuvilliés Theater — 19:00
Conductor: Karsten Januschke
Orchestra: Münchener Kammerorchester
2018-04-25 | München (Germany), Cuvilliés Theater — 19:00
Conductor: Karsten Januschke
Orchestra: Münchener Kammerorchester
2018-04-15 | München (Germany), Cuvilliés Theater — 19:00
Conductor: Karsten Januschke
Orchestra: Münchener Kammerorchester
2018-04-13 | München (Germany), Cuvilliés Theater — 19:00 | World Premiere
Other Editions